Some bin collections have stopped and rubbish tips are shut in parts of England.

Garden bin and recycling collections are also on hold in many areas, to give household and clinical waste priority.

Some councils reported lower staffing levels due to self-isolation and said employees had been redeployed to support essential services.

Authorities advised people to check council websites and if in doubt put bins out as normal.

Bin England

Those with coronavirus symptoms should put used tissues in a separate bin bag, tie it securely and leave it for 72 hours before putting it into their wheelie bin, the government has advised.

There were “significant disruptions to services” at Luton Borough Council where 134 members of staff were self-isolating, the Local Democracy Reporting Service said.

“As a result, we will be prioritising the collection of black waste bins and green recycling bins,” the authority said.

“This means we will be stopping all brown garden waste bins, glass collections, and food waste caddies from this week.”

Liberal Democrat Barnfield councilor David Franks said the plan seemed “like a recipe for a massive increase in fly-tipping.”

England Bin

In North Yorkshire, all tips have been closed and people urged not to create extra waste by doing DIY.

“While it is tempting to do DIY projects while following the government’s advice to stay at home… avoid creating unnecessary waste until tips can reopen,” a statement from North Yorkshire County Council said.

Cllr Andrew Lee, the executive member for waste management, told residents to hang on to bulky waste until the sites reopen.

“Don’t be tempted to fly tip. Fly tipping is an offense and offenders will be prosecuted,” he said.

In Hampshire tips have been closed after “record-breaking” use over the weekend, despite official warnings about social distancing.

Deputy leader of Hampshire County Council Rob Humby said: “Last weekend over 29,000 people visited Hampshire HWRCs – to put that into context, our busiest Easter bank holiday weekends might see a maximum of 22,000 people.”

Bin England

Residents of Queen’s Walk in Stamford, Lincolnshire stuck notes to their bins thanking refuse workers.

Mel Amara-Carnell, 46, posted the idea in her street’s WhatsApp group.

“If the bins aren’t collected the rubbish can build up and end up overflowing – we could then end up with more disease,” she said.

“When I first moved to this street we used to meet for drinks on the green and sing carols at Christmas. That gradually faded away.

“These circumstances have brought us all together again.”

Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-52017641

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